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The Shocking Truth: who Invented the electric char?

who invented the electric chair

The electric chair is a device used for capital punishment, in which the condemned person is executed by electrocution. But who created this infamous device? In this blog post, we will explore the history of the electric chair and the person who invented it.

The electric chair was invented by a dentist named Dr. Albert Southwick. In 1881, Southwick was walking through a park when he saw a man accidentally touch an exposed electrical wire and die instantly. This event inspired Southwick to research the use of electricity for executions.

In 1886, Southwick wrote a letter to the editor of the New York Times, suggesting that electricity could be used for capital punishment. His letter caught the attention of the New York State Legislature, which formed a committee to investigate the use of electricity for executions.

The committee hired a man named Harold P. Brown to develop an electric chair. Brown worked with Thomas Edison’s company to develop the device, which was first used in 1890 to execute a man named William Kemmler.

The electric chair was widely adopted as a method of execution in the United States, and it remained in use for many years. However, it was not without controversy. Many people argued that it was a cruel and unusual form of punishment, and it was eventually replaced by more humane methods of execution.

In conclusion, the electric chair was invented by Dr. Albert Southwick, a dentist who was inspired by a tragic accident in a park. The device was developed by Harold P. Brown and Thomas Edison’s company, and it was first used in 1890 to execute William Kemmler. Although the electric chair had a significant impact on the history of capital punishment, it was eventually replaced by more humane methods of execution.

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